Using Profiles

//Using Profiles
Using Profiles 2018-02-13T06:06:02+00:00

Project Description

The osPID can store and run profiles. Profiles are useful when you have more than 1 setpoint and for each setpoint you have different ramp and waiting time. A good example where profiles is needed is in SMT reflowing. By using profiles, you can have different curve (like for example lead-free reflow and leaded reflow profiles) and load them to run on the osPID depending on your need.

Profiles

Profiles can be constructed using a simple human readable text file and send to the osPID unit to be stored on-board and run using the on-board user interface.

Profiles can be constructed using simple human readable text in the form of:

TYPE OF OPERATION, SETPOINT, DURATION

Item Description
Type of operation Ramp, 1 Ramp towards setpoint within a specific duration. Ramp operation can be a negative or positive slope. The duration set will define the rate of increase/decrease.┬áRamp operation is specified using the value “1”.
Wait, 2 Wait operation usually follows after a ramp operation. Wait operation is specified using the value “2” with zero duration.
Step, 3 An instantaneous increase or decrease of setpoint without any specific duration. Step operation is specified using the value “3” with zero duration.
Setpoint Desired value for the either a ramp or step operation. Setpoint must be set as zero for wait operation and buzzer usage.
Duration Duration in seconds for a specific operation. For ramp operation, this reflects the rate of the ramp process. For wait operation, it reflects how long it shall stay on the current setpoint. Duration must be set as zero for step operation, wait operation and buzzer usage.
On-board buzzer The on-board buzzer can be used as an indication of profile completion or anywhere within the profile. Buzzer usage is specified using the value “127” with a non-zero duration.

 

An example of a profile file:

RoHS //first row is Profile Name
3, 30, 0 //Step Setpoint to 30, wait 0 seconds
2, 0, 0 //Wait for PID Input to cross setpoint
1, 150, 60 //ramp setpoint to 150 over the course of 60 seconds
2, 0, 0 //Wait for PID Input to cross setpoint
1, 200, 120 //ramp setpoint to 200 over the course of 120 seconds
2, 0, 0 //Wait for PID Input to cross setpoint
1, 245, 60 //ramp setpoint to 245 over the course of 60 seconds
2, 0, 0 //Wait for PID Input to cross setpoint
1, 218, 30 //ramp setpoint to 218 over the course of 30 seconds
2, 0, 0 //Wait for PID Input to cross setpoint
1, 50, 150 //ramp setpoint to 50 over the course of 150 seconds
2, 0, 0 //Wait for PID Input to cross setpoint
127, 0, 5 //buzz for 5 seconds

Profile file must be saved in .txt format and stored in locations that depends on either you are using a precompiled version of the frontend software or running the frontend software from the Processing IDE itself.

If you are running the precompiled version of the frontend, the profile files must be stored within the profile folder residing within the compiled frontend folder:

Compiled Frontend Profile Storage

But, if you are running the frontend software through the Processing IDE (not compiled version), the profile files must be stored within the profile folder residing within the frontend software files folder:

Not Compiled Frontend Profile Storage

Within the profile folder, here’s an example how 2 different profiles are stored:

Profiles Storage

Profiles can be loaded on the osPID kit unit through the frontend software. Once loaded, the profile is available and can be selected for use through the on-board UI.

Loading Profile

 

Profile On UI